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KAHLO

Frida Kahlo (1907-1954) Skip to Images

"In 1953, when Frida Kahlo had her first solo exhibition in Mexico (the only one held in her native country during her lifetime), a local critic wrote: 'It is impossible to separate the life and work of this extraordinary person. Her paintings are her biography.'

This observation serves to explain both why her work is so different from that of her contemporaries, the Mexican Muralists, and why she has since become a feminist icon.

We’ve put together a large gallery of Frida’s stunning works – enjoy!

From Edward Lucie-Smith, "Lives of the Great 20th-Century Artists":

"Kahlo was born in Mexico City in 1907, the third daughter of Guillermo and Matilda Kahlo. Her father was a photographer of Hungarian Jewish descent, who had been born in Germany; her mother was Spanish and Native American. Her life was to be a long series of physical traumas, and the first of these came early. At the age of six she was stricken with polio, which left her with a limp. In childhood, she was nevertheless a fearless tomboy, and this made Frida her father's favourite. He had advanced ideas about her education, and in 1922 she entered the Preparatoria (National Preparatory School), the most prestigious educational institution in Mexico, which had only just begun to admit girls. She was one of only thirty-five girls out of two thousand students.

"It was there that she met her husband-to-be, Diego Rivera, who had recently returned home from France, and who had been commissioned to paint a mural there. Kahlo was attracted to him, and not knowing quite how to deal with the emotions she felt, expressed them by teasing him, playing practical jokes, and by trying to excite the jealousy of the painter's wife, Lupe Marin.

"In 1925, Kahlo suffered the serious accident which was to set the pattern for much of the rest of her life. She was travelling in a bus which collided with a tramcar, and suffered serious injuries to her right leg and pelvis. The accident made it impossible for her to have children, though it was to be many years before she accepted this. It also meant that she faced a life-long battle against pain. In 1926, during her convalescence, she painted her first self-portrait, the beginning of a long series in which she charted the events of her life and her emotional reactions to them.

"She met Rivera again in 1928, through her friendship with the photographer and revolutionary Tina Modotti. Rivera's marriage had just disintegrated, and the two found that they had much in common, not least from a political point of view, since both were now communist militants. They married in August 1929. Kahlo was later to say: 'I suffered two grave accidents in my life. One in which a streetcar knocked me down... The other accident is Diego.'

"The political climate in Mexico was deteriorating for those with left-wing sympathies, thanks to the reactionary Calles government, and the mural-painting programme initiated by the great Minister of Education Jose Vasconcelos had ground to a halt. But Rivera's artistic reputation was expanding rapidly in the United States. In 1930, the couple left for San Francisco; then, after a brief return to Mexico, they went to New York in 1931 for the Rivera retrospective organized by the Museum of Modern Art. Kahlo, at this stage, was regarded chiefly as a charming appendage to a famous husband, but the situation was soon to change. In 1932 Rivera was commissioned to paint a major series of murals for the Detroit Museum, and here Kahlo suffered a miscarriage. While recovering, she painted Miscarriage in Detroit, the first of her truly penetrating self-portraits. The style she evolved was entirely unlike that of her husband, being based on Mexican folk art and in particular on the small votive pictures known as retablos, which the pious dedicated in Mexican churches. Rivera's reaction to his wife's work was, however, both perceptive and generous:

Frida began work on a series of masterpieces which had no precedent in the history of art - paintings which exalted the feminine quality of truth, reality, cruelty and suffering. Never before had a woman put such agonized poetry on canvas as Frida did at this time in Detroit.

"Kahlo, however, pretended not to consider her work important. As her biographer Hayden Herrera notes, 'she preferred to be seen as a beguiling personality rather than as a painter.' From Detroit they went once again to New York, where Rivera had been commissioned to paint a mural in the Rockefeller Center. The commission erupted into an enormous scandal, when the patron ordered the half-completed work destroyed because of the political imagery Rivera insisted on including. But Rivera lingered in the United States, which he loved and Kahlo now loathed. When they finally returned to Mexico in 1935, Rivera embarked on an affair with Kahlo's younger sister Cristina. Though they finally made up their quarrel, this incident marked a turning point in their relationship. Rivera had never been faithful to any woman; Kahlo now embarked on a series of affairs with both men and women which were to continue for the rest of her life. Rivera tolerated her lesbian relationships better than he did the heterosexual ones, which made him violently jealous. One of Kahlo's more serious early love affairs was with the Russian revolutionary leader Leon Trotsky, now being hounded by his triumphant rival Stalin, and who had been offered refuge in Mexico in 1937 on Rivera's initiative. Another visitor to Mexico at this time, one who would gladly have had a love affair with Kahlo but for the fact that she was not attracted to him, was the leading figure of the Surrealist Group, André Breton. Breton arrived in 1938 and was enchanted with Mexico, which he found to be a 'naturally surrealist' country, and with Kahlo's painting. Partly through his initiative, she was offered a show at the fashionable Julian Levy Gallery in New York later in 1938, and Breton himself wrote a rhetorical catalogue preface. The show was a triumph, and about half the paintings were sold. In 1939, Breton suggested a show in Paris, and offered to arrange it. Kahlo, who spoke no French, arrived in France to find that Breton had not even bothered to get her work out of customs.

"The enterprise was finally rescued by Marcel Duchamp, and the show opened about six weeks late. It was not a financial success, but the reviews were good, and the Louvre bought a picture for the Jeu de Paume. Kahlo also won praise from Kandinsky and Picasso. She had, however, conceived a violent dislike for what she called 'this bunch of coocoo lunatic sons of bitches of surrealists.' She did not renounce Surrealism immediately. in January 1940, for example, she was a participant (with Rivera) in the International Exhibition of Surrealism held in Mexico City. Later, she was to be vehement in her denials that she had ever been a true Surrealist. 'They thought I was a Surrealist,' she said, 'but I wasn't. I never painted dreams. I painted my own reality.'

"Early in 1940, for motives which are still somewhat mysterious, Kahlo and Rivera divorced, though they continued to make public appearances together. In May, after the first attempt on Trotsky's life, led by the painter Siqueiros, Rivera thought it prudent to leave for San Francisco. After the second, and successful attempt, Kahlo, who had been a friend of Trotsky's assassin, was questioned by the police. She decided to leave Mexico for a while, and in September she joined her ex-husband. Less than two months later, while they were still in the United States, they remarried. One reason seems to have been Rivera's recognition that Kahlo's health would inexorably deteriorate, and that she needed someone to look after her.

"Her health, never at any time robust, grew visibly worse from about 1944 onwards, and Kahlo underwent the first many operations on her spine and her crippled foot. Authorities on her life and work have questioned whether all these operations were really necessary, or whether they were in fact a way of holding Rivera's attention in the face of his numerous affairs with other women. In Kahlo's case, her physical and psychological sufferings were always linked. in early 1950, her physical state reached a crisis, and she had to go into hospital in Mexico City, where she remained for a year.

"During the period after her remarriage, her artistic reputation continued to grow, though at first more rapidly in the United States than in Mexico itself. she was included in prestigious group shows in the Museum of Modern Art, the Boston Institute of Contemporary Arts and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. In 1946, however, she received a Mexican government fellowship, and in the same year an official prize on the occasion of the Annual National Exhibition. She also took up teaching at the new experimental art school 'La Esmeralda', and, despite her unconventional methods, proved an inspiration to her students. After her return home from hospital, Kahlo became an increasingly fervent and impassioned Communist. Rivera had been expelled from the Party, which was reluctant to receive him back, both because of his links with the Mexican government of the day, and because of his association with Trotsky. Kahlo boasted: 'I was a member of the Party before I met Diego and I think I am a better Communist than he is or ever will be.'

"While the 1940s had seen her produce some of her finest work, her paintings now became more clumsy and chaotic, thanks to the joint effects of pain, drugs and drink. Despite this, in 1953 she was offered her first solo show in Mexico itself - which was to be the only such show held in her own lifetime. It took place at the fashionable Galeria de Arte Contemporaneo in the Zona Rosa of Mexico City. At first it seemed that Kahlo would be too ill to attend, but she sent her richly decorated fourposter bed ahead of her, arrived by ambulance, and was carried into the gallery on a stretcher. The private view was a triumphal occasion.

"In the same year, Kahlo, threatened by gangrene, had her right leg amputated below the knee. It was a tremendous blow to someone who had invested so much in the elaboration of her own self image. She learned to walk again with an artificial limb, and even (briefly and with the help of pain-killing drugs) danced at celebrations with friends. But the end was close. In July 1954, she made her last public appearance, when she participated in a Communist demonstration against the overthrow of the left-wing Guatemalan president Jacobo Arbenz. Soon afterwards, she died in her sleep, apparently as the result of an embolism, though there was a suspicion among those close to her that she had found a way to commit suicide. Her last diary entry read: 'I hope the end is joyful - and I hope never to come back - Frida.'"

 

 KAHLO_FRUITS_OF_THE_EARTH

Kahlo, Frida Fruits of the Earth 1938 Oil on masonite 16 x 23 1/2 in. (40.6 x 60 cm) Collection Banco Nacional de Mexico, S.A., Mexico City

kahlo_Self-Portrait_as_a_Tehuana

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Self-Portrait as a Tehuana. 1943. Oil on masonite. Private collection

kahlo_Self-Portrait

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Self-Portrait. 1929. Oil on masonite. 79.4 x 70 cm Private collection.

kahlo_Portrait_of_Virginia_(Nina)

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Portrait of Virginia (Nina). 1929. Oil on Masonite. 83.8 x 68 cm. Dolores Olmedo Foundation, Mexico City, Mexico.

kahlo_Two_Women

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Two Women. 1929. Oil on canvas. 69.3 x 53.3. Private collection

kahlo_The_Bus

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. The Bus. 1929. Oil on canvas. 26 x 56 cm. Dolores Olmedo Foundation, Mexico City, Mexico.

kahlo_Portrait_of_Lupe_Marin

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Portrait of Lupe Marin.

kahlo_Self-Portrait

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Self-Portrait. 1930. Oil on canvas. 66 x 56 cm. Private collection.

kahlo_Self-Portrait_(Dedicated_to_Leon_Trotsky)

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Self-Portrait (Dedicated to Leon Trotsky). 1937. Oil on masonite. 76.2 x 61 cm. National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, D.C., USA

kahlo_Frida_and_Diego_Rivera

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Frida and Diego Rivera. 1931.Oil on canvas. 99 x 78.7 cm. San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, CA, USA

kahlo_Portrait_of_Eva_Frederick

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Portrait of Eva Frederick. 1931. Oil on canvas. 62.9 x 47 cm. Dolores Olmedo Foundation, Mexico City, Mexico.

kahlo_Henry_Ford_Hospital

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Henry Ford Hospital. 1932. Oil on metal. 31.1 x 39.3 cm. Dolores Olmedo Foundation, Mexico City, Mexico.

kahlo_Self-Portrait_with_Monkey

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Self-Portrait with Monkey. 1938. Oil on masonite. 40 x 30 cm. Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY, USA.

kahlo_Me_and_My_Doll

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Me and My Doll. 1937. Oil on metal. 40 x 32 cm. Private collection.

kahlo_The_Deceased_Dimas

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. The Deceased Dimas. 1937.Oil on Masonite. 48 x 31 cm. Dolores Olmedo Foundation, Mexico City, Mexico.

kahlo_Itzcuintli_Dog_with_Me

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Itzcuintli Dog with Me. 1938. Oil on canvas. 28 x 20 cm. Private collection.

kahlo_Self-Portrait_with_Monkeys

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Self-Portrait with Monkeys. 1943. Oil on canvas. 81 x 35 cm. Private collection

kahlo_Luther_Burbank

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Luther Burbank. 1931. Oil on Masonite. 88 x 62 cm. Dolores Olmedo Foundation, Mexico City, Mexico.

kahlo_Fruits_of_the_Earth

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Fruits of the Earth. 1938. Oil on Masonite. 34.5 x 60 cm. Collection of the Banco Nacional de Nexico, Fomento Cultural Banamex, Mexico City.

kahlo_Tunas_(Still_Life_with_Prickly_Pear_Fruit)

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Tunas (Still Life with Prickly Pear Fruit). 1938. Oil on Masonite.

kahlo_Pitahayas

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Pitahayas. 1938. Oil on metal. 25.5 x 35.5 cm Madison Art Center, Madison, Wisconsin, USA.

kahlo_Flower_of_Life

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Flower of Life. 1944. Oil on Mesonite. 29.5 x 23 cm. Dolores Olmedo Foundation, Mexico City, Mexico.

kahlo_Sun_and_Life

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Sun and Life. 1947. Oil on Masonite. 40 x 49.5 cm. Private collection.

kahlo_My_Birth

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. My Birth. 1932. Oil on metal. 31 x 35 cm. Private collection.

kahlo_Moses

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Moses. 1945.Oil on Masonite. 94 x 50.8 cm. Private collection.

kahlo_Self-Portrait_on_the_Border_Line_Between_Mexico_and_the_United_States

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Self-Portrait on the Border Line Between Mexico and the United States. 1932. Oil on metal 31.7 x 35 cm. Private collection.

kahlo_My_Dress_Hangs_There

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. My Dress Hangs There. 1933. Oil and collage on Masonite. 45.8 x 50.2 cm. Private collection.

kahlo_Self-Portrait

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Self-Portrait. 1933. Oil on metal. 34.3 x 29.2 cm. Private collection.

kahlo_A_Few_Small_Nips

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. A Few Small Nips. 1935. Oil on metal. 38 x 48.2 cm. Dolores Olmedo Foundation, Mexico City, Mexico.

kahlo_Memory

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Memory. 1937. Oil on metal. 38 x 48.2 cm. Dolores Olmedo Foundation, Mexico City, Mexico.

kahlo_Portrait_of_Diego_Rivera

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Portrait of Diego Rivera. 1937. Oil on wood. 461 x 31.7 cm. Private collection.

kahlo_The_Frame

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. The Frame. c. 1937. Oil on metal with glass. 29 x 21.5 cm. Musée National d'Art Moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, France

kahlo_What_the_Water_Gave_Me

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. What the Water Gave Me. 1938. Oil on canvas. 96.5 x 76.2 cm Private collection.

kahlo_Two_Nudes_in_the_Forest

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Two Nudes in the Forest. 1939. Oil on sheet metal. 25 x 30 cm Private collection.

kahlo_My_Nurse_and_I

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. My Nurse and I. 1937. Oil on metal. 29.8 x 34.9 cm. Dolores Olmedo Foundation, Mexico City, Mexico.

kahlo_Diary_pages:_

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Diary pages: "El horrendo 'ojosauro.'"Diary pages: "Portrait of Neferunico, Founder of Madness." Frida Kahlo Museum, Mexico City, Mexico

kahlo_Diary_Pages:_

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Diary Pages: "Bird" Diary pages: "Masked Dancers." Frida Kahlo Museum, Mexico City, Mexico.

kahlo_The_Two_Fridas

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. The Two Fridas. 1939. Oil on canvas. 170 x 170 cm. Museo de Arte Moderno, Mexico City, Mexico.

kahlo_The_Suicide_of_Dorothy_Hale

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. The Suicide of Dorothy Hale. 1939. Oil on masonite. 60.4 x 48.6 cm. The Phoenix Art Museum, Phoenix, AZ, USA

kahlo_The_Dream

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. The Dream. 1940. Oil on canvas. 74 x 98.5 cm Private collection.

kahlo_Self-Portrait

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Self-Portrait. 1940. Oil on canvas. 62 x 47.7 cm Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, University of Texas, Austin, TX, USA.

kahlo_Self-Portrait

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Self-Portrait. 1940. Oil on Masonite. 59.8 x 40 cm Private collection.

kahlo_Self-Portrait

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Self-Portrait. 1940. Oil on Masonite. 61 x 43 cm Private collection.

kahlo_Fulang-Chang_and_I

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Fulang-Chang and I. 1937. Oil on composition board. 40 x 28 cm. The Museum of Modern Arts, New York, NY, USA.

kahlo_Self-Portrait_with_Monkey

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Self-Portrait with Monkey. 1940. Oil on Masonite. 53.2 x 42.6 cm. Private collection.

kahlo_Dona_Rosita_Morillo

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Dona Rosita Morillo. 1944. Oil on canvas, mounted on masonite. 77.4 x 72.4 cm. Dolores Olmedo Foundation, Mexico City, Mexico.

kahlo_Self-Portrait_with_Cropped_Hair

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Self-Portrait with Cropped Hair. 1940. Oil on canvas 40 x 28 cm. The Museum of Modern Arts, New York, NY, USA.

kahlo_Self-Portrait_with_Bonito

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Self-Portrait with Bonito. 1941. Oil on canvas. 55 x 43.5 cm. Private collection.

kahlo_Self-Portrait_with_Braid

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Self-Portrait with Braid. 1941. Private collection.

kahlo_Portrait_of_Marucha_Lavin

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Portrait of Marucha Lavin. 1942. Oil on copper. 65 cm diameter. Private collection.

kahlo_Me_and_My_Parrots

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Me and My Parrots. 1941. Oil on canvas 81 x 62.2 cm. Private collection.

kahlo_The_Bride_Frightened_at_Seeing_Life_Opened

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. The Bride Frightened at Seeing Life Opened. 1943. Oil on canvas. 63 x 81.3 cm Private collection.

kahlo_Self-Portrait_with_Monkey_and_Parrot

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Self-Portrait with Monkey and Parrot. 1942. Oil on Masonite. 53.4 x 43.2 cm. Private collection.

kahlo_Thinking_about_Death

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Thinking about Death. 1943. Oil on canvas mounted on Masonite. 45 x 36.8 cm. Dolores Olmedo Foundation, Mexico City, Mexico.

kahlo_Self-Portrait

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Self-Portrait. 1948. Oil on Masonite 48.2 x 39.5 cm. Private collection.

kahlo_Diego_and_I

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Diego and I. 1949. Oil on Masonite. 29.5 x 22.5 cm. Private collection.

kahlo_Portrait_of_Don_Guillermo_Kahlo

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Portrait of Don Guillermo Kahlo. 1951. Oil on masonite. 60.4 x 46.4 cm. Frida Kahlo Museum, Mexico City, Mexico.

kahlo_The_Love_Embrace_of_the_Universe,_the_Earth _(Mexico),_Diego,_Me,_and_Senor_Xolotl

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. The Love Embrace of the Universe, the Earth (Mexico), Diego, Me, and Senor Xolotl. 1949. Oil on canvas. 69.8 x 60.6 cm .Private collection

kahlo_The_Broken_Column

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. The Broken Column. 1944. Oil on Masonite. 38.6 x 31 cm Dolores Olmedo Foundation, Mexico City, Mexico.

kahlo_Self-Portrait_with_Small_Monkey

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Self-Portrait with Small Monkey. 1945. Oil on Masonite. 56 x 41.1 cm. Dolores Olmedo Foundation, Mexico City, Mexico.

kahlo_Without_Hope

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Without Hope. 1945. Oil on canvas mounted on Masonite. 28 x 36 cm. Dolores Olmedo Foundation, Mexico City, Mexico

kahlo_Magnolias

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Magnolias. 1945. Oil on masonite. 41.2 x 57 cm. Private collection.

kahlo_The_Little_Deer

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. The Little Deer. 1946 Oil on masonite. 22.5 x 30 cm. Private collection.

kahlo_Tree_of_Hope

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Tree of Hope. 1946 Oil on masonite. 55.8 x 40.7 cm. Private collection.

kahlo_Self-Portrait_with_Loose_Hair

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Self-Portrait with Loose Hair. 1947. Oil on masonite. 61 x 45 cm Private collection.

kahlo_Self-Portrait_with_the_Portrait_of_Doctor_Farill

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Self-Portrait with the Portrait of Doctor Farill. 1951. Oil on masonite. 41.8 x 50.2 cm. Private collection.

kahlo_Still_Life_with_Parrot

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Still Life with Parrot. 1951. Oil on canvas. 25.4 x 28.9 cm. Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, University of Texas, Austin, TX, USA.

kahlo_Four_Inhabitants_of_Mexico

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Four Inhabitants of Mexico. 1938. Oil on wood panel. 131.1 x 47.6 cm Private collection.

kahlo_Fruit_of_Life

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Fruit of Life. 1954 Oil on masonite. 45 x 62 cm. Private collection.

kahlo_Naturaleza_viva

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Naturaleza viva. 1952. Oil on canvas. Private collection.

kahlo_Viva_la_vida

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Viva la vida. 1954. Oil on masonite. 59 x 50.7 cm. Frida Kahlo Museum, Mexico City, Mexico.

kahlo_My_Grandparents,_My_Parents,_and_I

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. My Grandparents, My Parents, and I. 1936. Oil and tempera on metal panel. 30.5 x 35 cm. The Museum of Modern Arts, New York, NY, USA.

kahlo_Girl_with_Death_Mask

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Girl with Death Mask. 1938. Oil on metal. 19.8 x 14.7 cm. Private collection.

kahlo_Self-Portrait

Kahlo

Kahlo

Frida Kahlo. Self-Portrait. 1926. Oil on canvas. 79 x 58 cm Private collection