ABC Gallery, Dali, Salvador, Salvador Dali, World's, Painters, Great Artist, Largest, Online, Fine, Velázquez, Art, Gallery, artchive, abc gallery, gallery abc, black goya painting, beautiful pictures, cezanne, caravaggio, Images, fine art tattoos, fine art tattoo, added, picaso,goya paintings, rose period, blue period, early works, daily, 畢加索 , piccasso, picaso, from, Picasso, to, Pissaro, and, Bernini, to, Bellini, Over, 14,000, images, of, oil, paintings, from, Abstract Expressionists African Art ALTDORFER American Art Ancient Art ARDON ARP Art Nouveau AVERY BACON BAILEY BALLA BALTHUS Baroque BASQUIAT Bauhaus BAUMEISTER BAZILLE BEARDSLEY BECKMANN BELLINI BELLOTTO BELLOWS BERNINI BEUYS BIERSTADT BINGHAM BLAKE BLUEMNER BOCCIONI BÖCKLIN BOHROD BONNARD BOSCH BOTERO BOTTICELLI BOUDIN BOUGUEREAU BRANCUSI BRAQUE BRONZINO BROWN BRUCE BRUEGEL BURCHFIELD BURNE-JONES CAILLEBOTTE CAMPIN CANALETTO CARAVAGGIO CARR CARRACCI CASSATT Cave Paintings CÉZANNE CHAGALL CHARDIN CHIHULY Chinese Art CHURCH CIMABUE CLEMENTE COLE CONSTABLE Contemporary COPLEY CORINTH CORNELL COROT CORREGGIO COURBET CRANACH CRIVELLI Cubism Dada DALÍ DAUBIGNY DAUMIER DAVID, G DAVID, J- L DE CHIRICO DE HOOCH DE KOONING DE LA TOUR DEGAS DELACROIX DELAUNAY DEMUTH DERAIN DIEBENKORN DONATELLO DONGEN DOVE DUBUFFET DUCHAMP DUFY DURAND DÜRER EAKINS Egyptian Art EL GRECO ERNST ESCHER Expressionism FISCHL FRA ANGELICO FRA CARNEVALE FRAGONARD FRANKENTHALER FREUD FRIEDRICH FUSELI Futurism GAINSBOROUGH GAUDI GAUGUIN GENTILESCHI GERICAULT GHIBERTI GHIRLANDAIO GIACOMETTI GIORGIONE GIOTTO GLACKENS GOES GOODMAN GOYA GRAY Greek Art GRIS Group of Seven GRÜNEWALD GUSTON HALS HARING HARNETT HARTLEY HASSAM HAUSMANN HEADE HENRI HEPWORTH HESSE HIROSHIGE HIRST HOCKNEY HODGKIN HOGARTH HOKUSAI HOLBEIN HOMER HOPPER Hudson River School HUNDERTWASSER HUNT IMMENDORFF Impressionism INGRES INNESS JOHNS JORDAENS KAHLO KANDINSKY KENSETT KIEFER KIENHOLZ KIRCHNER KITAJ KLEE KLIMT KLINE KOKOSCHKA LAWRENCE LE NAIN LEGER LEONARDO LEVINE LEYSTER LICHTENSTEIN LIOTARD LIPPI LISSITZKY LOTTO LÜPERTZ MACKE MAGRITTE MALEVICH MAN RAY MANET MANTEGNA MARC MARSH MARTINI MASACCIO MATISSE MEMLING MICHELANGELO MILLAIS MILLET MIRO MITCHELL MODIGLIANI MONDRIAN MONET MOORE MORAN MORANDI MOREAU MORISOT MUCHA MUNCH MURILLO MURRAY Neo-Classical NEEL NOLDE O'KEEFFE PARMIGIANINO PEARLSTEIN PETO Photographers PICASSO PIERO della FRANCESCA PIERO di COSIMO PIRANESI PISSARRO POLKE POLLOCK Pop Art PORTER POSADA Post-Impressionism POUSSIN Pre-Raphaelites PRENDERGAST PUVIS RAPHAEL RAUSCHENBERG REDON REMBRANDT REMINGTON Renaissance Art RENOIR RICHTER RIVERA ROCKWELL Rococo RODIN Roman Art Romanticism ROSSETTI ROTHKO ROUAULT H. ROUSSEAU T. ROUSSEAU ROUSSEL RUBENS RUISDAEL RYDER SARGENT SCHIELE SCHWITTERS Sculptors SEURAT SHEELER SIGNAC SIGNORELLI SISLEY SLOAN SOHLBERG SOROLLA Spanish Art SPILLIAERT DE STAEL Surrealism SWEERTS Symbolism TAMAYO TANNER TANSEY THIEBAUD TIEPOLO TINTORETTO TISSOT TITIAN TOULOUSE-LAUTREC TREVIÑO TURNER TWOMBLY UCCELLO VAN DYCK VAN EYCK VAN GOGH VELÁZQUEZ VERMEER VERONESE WARHOL WATTEAU WEST WEYDEN WHISTLER Women Artists WYETH ZURBARAN Velazquez

GAUGUIN

Paul Gauguin
(1848-1903)

"Notes Synthetiques", by Paul Gauguin
From the manuscript, c. 1888

Excerpted from "Theories of Modern Art", by Herschel B. Chipp

"Painting is the most beautiful of all arts. In it, all sensations are condensed; contemplating it, everyone can create a story at the will of his imagination and-with a single glance-have his soul invaded by the most profound recollections; no effort of memory, everything is summed up in one instant. -A complete art which sums up all the others and completes them. -Like music, it acts on the soul through the intermediary of the senses: harmonious colors correspond to the harmonies of sounds. But in painting a unity is obtained which is not possible in music, where the accords follow one another, so that the judgment experiences a continuous fatigue if it wants to reunite the end with the beginning. The ear is actually a sense inferior to the eye. The hearing can only grasp a single sound at a time, whereas the sight takes in everything and simultaneously simplifies it at will.

"Like literature, the art of painting tells whatever it wishes, with the advantage that the reader immediately knows the prelude, the setting, and the ending. Literature and music require an effort of memory for the appreciation of the whole; the last named is the most incomplete and the least powerful of arts.

"You can dream freely when you listen to music as well as when looking at a painting. When you read a book, you are a slave of the author's thought. The author is obliged to address himself to the mind before he can impress the heart, and God knows how little power a reasoned sensation has. Sight alone produced an instantaneous impulse. But then, the men of letters alone are art-critics; they alone defend themselves before the public. Their introductions are always a justification of their work, as if really good work does not defend itself on its own.

"These gentlemen flutter about the world like bats which flap their wings in the twilight and whose dark mass appears to you in every direction; animals disquieted by their fate, their too heavy bodies preventing them from rising. Throw them a handkerchief full of sand and they will stupidly make a rush at it.

"One must listen to them judging all human works. God has created man after his own image which, obviously, is flattering for man. "This work pleases me and is done exactly the way I should have conceived it." All art criticism is like that: to agree with the public, to seek a work after one's own image. Yes, gentlemen of letters, you are incapable of criticizing a work of art, be it even a book. Because you are already corrupt judges; you have beforehand a ready-made idea-that of the man of letters-and have too high an opinion of your own thoughts to examine those of others. You do not like blue, therefore you condemn all blue paintings. If you are a sensitive and melancholy poet, you want all compositions to be in a minor key. -Such a one likes graciousness and must have everything that way. Another one likes gaiety and does not understand a sonata.

"it takes intelligence and knowledge in order to judge a book. To judge painting and music requires special sensations of nature besides intelligence and artistic science; in a word, one has to be a born artist, and few are chosen among all those who are called. Any idea can be formulated, but not so the sensation of the heart. What efforts are not needed to master fear or a moment of enthusiasm! Is not love often instantaneous and nearly always blind? And to say that thought is called spirit, whereas the instincts, the nerves, and the heart are part of matter. What irony!

"The vaguest, the most undefinable, the most varied is precisely matter. Thought is a slave of sensations. I have always wondered why one speaks of "noble instincts." . . .

"Above man is nature.

"Literature is human thought described by words.

"Whatever talent you may have in telling me how Othello appears, his heart devoured by jealousy, to kill Desdemona, my soul will never be as much impressed as when I have seen Othello with my own eyes entering the room, his forehead presaging the storm. That is why you need the stage to complement your work.

"You may describe a tempest with talent-you will never succeed in conveying to me the sensation of it.

"Instrumental music as well as numbers are based on a unit. The entire musical system derives from this principle, and the ear has become used to all these divisions. The unit is established through the means of an instrument, yet you may choose some other basis and the tones, half-tones, and quarter-tones will follow each other. Outside of these you will have dissonance. The eye is used less than the ear to perceive these dissonances, but then divisions [of color] are more numerous, and for further complication there are several units.

"On an instrument, you start from one tone. In painting you start from several. Thus, you begin with black and divide up to white-the first unit, the easiest and the most frequently used one, hence the best understood. But take as many units as there are colors in the rainbow, add those made up by composite colors, and you will reach a rather respectable number of units. What an accumulation of numbers, truly a Chinese puzzle! No wonder then that the colorist's science has been so little investigated by the painters and is so little understood by the public. Yet what richness of means to attain an intimate relationship with nature!

"They reprove our colors which we put [unmixed] side by side. In this domain we are perforce victorious, since we are powerfully helped by nature which does not proceed otherwise. A green next to a red does not produce a reddish brown, like the mixture [of pigments], but two vibrating tones. If you put chrome yellow next to this red, you have three tones complementing each other and augmenting the intensity of the first tone: the green. Replace the yellow by a blue, you will find three different tones, though still vibrating through one another. If instead of the blue you apply a violet, the result will be a single tone, but a composite one, belonging to the reds.

"The combinations are unlimited. The mixture of colors produces a dirty tone. Any color alone is a crudity and does not exist in nature. Colors exist only in an apparent rainbow, but how well rich nature took care to show them to you side by side in an established and unalterable order, as if each color was born out of another!

"Yet you have fewer means than nature, and you condemn yourself to renounce all those which it puts at your disposal. Will you ever have as much light as nature, as much heat as the sun? And you speak of exaggeration-but how can you exaggerate since you remain below nature?

"Ah! If you mean by exaggerated any badly balanced work, then you are right in that respect. But I must draw your attention to the fact that, although your work may be timid and pale, it will be considered exaggerated if there is a mistake of harmony in it. Is there then a science of harmony ? Yes.

"In that respect the feeling of the colorist is exactly the natural harmony. Like singers, painters sometimes are out of tune, their eye has no harmony. Later there will be, through study, an entire method of harmony, unless people neglect it, as is done in the academies and most of the time also in studios. Indeed, the study of painting has been divided into two categories. One learns to draw first and then to paint, which means that one applies color within a pre-established contour, not unlike a statue that is painted after it is finished. I must admit that until now I have understood only one thing about this practice, namely that color is nothing but an accessory. I 'Sir, you must draw properly before painting"-this is said in a pedantic manner; but then, all great stupidities are said that way.

"Does one wear shoes instead of gloves? Can you really make me believe that drawing does not derive from color, and vice-versa? To prove this, I commit myself to reduce or enlarge one and the same drawing, according to the color with which I fill it up. Try to draw a head by Rembrandt in his exact proportions and then put on the colors of Rubens-you will see what misshapen product you derive, while at the same time the colors will have become unharmonious.

"During the last hundred years large amounts have been spent for the propagation of drawing and the number of painters is increasing, yet no real progress has been made. Who are the painters we admire at the present? All those who reproved the schools, all those who drew their science from the personal observation of nature. Not one ..."

[manuscript not completed].

 GAUGUIN_Y_CHRIST

 

Gauguin, Paul The Yellow Christ (Le Christ jaune) 1889 Oil on canvas 36 1/4 x 28 7/8 in. (92.1 x 73.4 cm) Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY

 GAUGUIN_WHERE

 

Gauguin, Paul Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going? 1897 Oil on canvas 54 3/4 x 147 1/2 in. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

 GAUGUIN_VANGOGH

 

Gauguin, Paul Van Gogh Painting Sunflowers 1888 Oil on canvas 28 3/4 x 36 1/2 in. Private collection

 GAUGUIN_SWINEHRD

 

Gauguin, Paul The Swineherd, Brittany 1888 Oil on canvas 29 x 36 1/2 in. (74 x 93 cm) Los Angeles County Museum of Art

 GAUGUIN_SURPLAGE

 

Gauguin, Paul Femmes de Tahiti OR Sur la plage (Tahitian Women OR On the Beach) 1891 Oil on canvas 27 1/8 x 35 7/8 in. (69 x 91 cm) Musee d'Orsay, Paris

 GAUGUIN_SPIRIT

 

Gauguin, Paul Spirit of the Dead Watching 1892 Oil on burlap mounted on canvas 28 1/2 x 36 3/8 in. (72.4 x 92.4 cm) Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY

 GAUGUIN_PUPPIES

 

Gauguin, Paul Still Life with Three Puppies 1888 Oil on canvas 34 3/4 x 24 5/8 in. (88 x 62.5 cm) The Museum of Modern Art, New York

 GAUGUIN_MARKET

 

Gauguin, Paul Market Day 1892 Oil on canvas 28 3/4 x 36 1/8 in. (73 x 91.5 cm) Kunstmuseum, Basel

 GAUGUIN_MARIA

 

Gauguin, Paul We Hail Thee Mary 1891 Oil on canvas 44 3/4 x 34 1/2 in. (113.7 x 87.7 cm) Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

 GAUGUIN_MARAE

 

Gauguin, Paul There is the Marae 1892 Oil on canvas 26 3/4 x 35 3/4 in. (68 x 91 cm) Philadelphia Museum of Art

 GAUGUIN_LOULOU

 

Gauguin, Paul M. Loulou 1890 Oil on canvas 21 5/8 x 18 1/8 in. (55 x 46.2 cm) Barnes Foundation, Merion, PA

 GAUGUIN_LARTISTE

 

Gauguin, Paul Portrait de l'artiste (Self-portrait) c. 1893-94 Oil on canvas 18 1/8 x 15 in. (46 x 38 cm) Musee d'Orsay, Paris

 GAUGUIN_IDOL

 

Gauguin, Paul Portrait of the Artist with the Idol c. 1893 Oil on canvas 17 1/4 x 12 7/8 in. (43.8 x 32.7 cm) McNay Art Institute, San Antonio, TX

 GAUGUIN_gauguin_wrestling

 

Gauguin, Paul The Vision After the Sermon (Jacob Wrestling with the Angel) 1888 Oil on canvas 73 x 92 cm (28 3/4 x 36 1/4 in) National Galleries of Scotland, Edinburgh

 GAUGUIN_gauguin_white_horse

 

Gauguin, Paul The White Horse 1898 Oil on canvas 140 x 91 cm (55 1/8 x 35 7/8 in) Musee d'Orsay, Paris

 GAUGUIN_gauguin_virginity

 

Gauguin, Paul The Loss of Virginity 1890-91 Oil on canvas 90 x 130 cm (35 x 50 3/4 in) The Chrysler Museum, Norfolk, Virginia

 GAUGUIN_gauguin_sewing

 

Gauguin, Paul Nude Study, or Suzanne Sewing 1880 Oil on canvas 111.4 x 79.5 cm (43 1/2 x 31 in) Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen

 GAUGUIN_gauguin_riders_dtl

 

Gauguin, Paul Riders on the Beach Detail 1902 Oil on canvas 73 x 92 cm (28 1/2 x 35 7/8 in) Private collection

 GAUGUIN_gauguin_riders

 

Gauguin, Paul Riders on the Beach 1902 Oil on canvas 73 x 92 cm (28 1/2 x 35 7/8 in) Private collection

 GAUGUIN_gauguin_palette

 

Gauguin, Paul Self-portrait with Palette c. 1894 Oil on canvas 92 x 73 cm (35 7/8 x 28 1/2 in) Private collection

 GAUGUIN_gauguin_nevermore

 

Gauguin, Paul Nevermore 1897 Oil on canvas 60.5 x 116 cm (23 7/8 x 45 5/8 in) Courtauld Institute Galleries, London

 GAUGUIN_gauguin_mysterious

 

Gauguin, Paul Be Mysterious 1890 Lime wood and polychrome 73 x 95 x 0.5 cm (29 x 37 1/2 x 1/16 in) Musee d'Orsay, Paris

 GAUGUIN_gauguin_miserables

 

Gauguin, Paul Les Miserables 1888 Oil on canvas Rijksmuseum Vincent van Gogh, Amsterdam

 GAUGUIN_gauguin_matamoe

 

Gauguin, Paul Matamoe 1892 Oil on fine canvas 115 x 86 cm (45 1/4 x 33 7/8 in) Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow

 GAUGUIN_gauguin_laval

 

Gauguin, Paul Still Life with Profile of Laval 1886 Oil on canvas 46 x 38 cm (18 1/8 x 15 in) Josefowitz Collection

 GAUGUIN_gauguin_jug

 

Gauguin, Paul Jug in the Form of a Head, Self-portrait 1889 Height 19.3 cm (7 5/8 in) Stoneware glazed in olive green, gray and red Museum of Decorative Art, Copenhagen

 GAUGUIN_gauguin_idol

 

Gauguin, Paul Idol with a Pearl 1892 Tamanu wood polychromed and stained with gilding Height 25, diameter 12 cm (9 3/4 x 4 5/8 in) Musee d'Orsay, Paris

 GAUGUIN_gauguin_halo

 

Gauguin, Paul Self-portrait with Halo 1889 Oil on wood 79.6 x 51.7 cm (31 3/8 x 20 3/8 in) National Gallery of Art, Washington

 GAUGUIN_gauguin_haan

 

Gauguin, Paul Meyer de Haan 1889 Oil on wood 80 x 52 cm (31 1/2 x 20 1/2 in) Private collection, New York

 GAUGUIN_gauguin_faaturuma

 

Gauguin, Paul Faaturuma 1891 Oil on canvas 94.6 x 68.6 cm (36 7/8 x 26 3/4 in) The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City

 GAUGUIN_gauguin_dancing

 

Gauguin, Paul Breton Girls Dancing, Pont-Aven 1888 Oil on canvas 71.4 x 92.8 cm (28 1/8 x 36 1/2 in) National Gallery of Art, Washington

 GAUGUIN_gauguin_cow

 

Gauguin, Paul Seascape with Cow on the Edge of a Cliff 1888 Oil on canvas 73 x 60 cm (28 3/4 x 23 5/8 in) Musee des Arts Decoratifs, Paris

 GAUGUIN_gauguin_cezanne

 

Gauguin, Paul Portrait of a Woman, with Still Life by Cezanne 1890 Oil on canvas 65.3 x 54.9 cm (25 3/4 x 21 5/8 in) The Art Institute of Chicago

 GAUGUIN_gauguin_cafe

 

Gauguin, Paul At the Cafe 1888 Oil on canvas 92 x 72 cm (36 1/4 x 28 in) Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow

 GAUGUIN_gauguin_blue_trees

 

Gauguin, Paul Blue Trees 1888 Oil on canvas 92 x 73 cm (36 1/4 x 28 3/4 in) The Ordrupgaard Collection, Copenhagen

 GAUGUIN_gauguin_belle_angele

 

Gauguin, Paul La Belle Angele 1889 Oil on canvas 92 x 73 cm (36 1/4 x 28 3/4 in) Musee d'Orsay, Paris

 GAUGUIN_gauguin_aha

 

Gauguin, Paul Aha oe feii? (What! Are You Jealous?) 1892 Oil on coarse canvas 68 x 92 cm (26 1/2 x 35 7/8 in) Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow

 GAUGUIN_CONTES_BARBARES

 

Gauguin, Paul Contes barbares 1902 Oil on canvas 130 x 89 cm Museum Folkwang, Essen

 GAUGUIN_BRETONNE

 

Gauguin, Paul Paysanes Paysannes bretonnes (Breton peasant women) 1894 Oil on canvas 26 x 36 1/4 in. (66 x 92 cm) Musee d'Orsay, Paris

 GAUGUIN_ALYSCAMP

 

Gauguin, Paul Les Alyscamps, Arles 1888 Oil on canvas 35 7/8 x 28 3/8 in. (91 x 72 cm) Musee d'Orsay, Paris

gauguin_Breton_Shepherdess

Gauguin

Gauguin

Paul Gauguin. Breton Shepherdess. 1886. Oil on canvas. Laing Art Gallery, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK.

gauguin_Breton_Girls_Dancing,_Pont-Aven

Gauguin

Gauguin

Paul Gauguin. Breton Girls Dancing, Pont-Aven. 1888. Oil on canvas. The National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, USA.

gauguin_The_Meal_(The_Bananas)

Gauguin

Gauguin

Paul Gauguin. The Meal (The Bananas). 1891. Oil on canvas. Musée d'Orsay, Paris, France.

gauguin_Tahitian_Women_(On_the_Beach)

Gauguin

Gauguin

Paul Gauguin. Tahitian Women (On the Beach). 1891. Oil on canvas. Musée d'Orsay, Paris, France.

gauguin_Floral_and_Vegetal_Motifs

Gauguin

Gauguin

Paul Gauguin. Floral and Vegetal Motifs. 1893. Painting on glass. Musée d'Orsay, Paris, France.

gauguin_Tahitian_Woman_in_a_Landscape

Gauguin

Gauguin

Paul Gauguin. Tahitian Woman in a Landscape. 1893. Painting on glass. Oil on canvas. Musée d'Orsay, Paris, France.

gauguin_Breton_Landscape_(The_

Gauguin

Gauguin

Paul Gauguin. Breton Landscape (The "Moulin David"). 1894. Oil on canvas. Musée d'Orsay, Paris, France

gauguin_Breton_Village_in_Snow

Gauguin

Gauguin

Paul Gauguin. Breton Village in Snow. 1894. Oil on canvas. Musée d'Orsay, Paris, France.

gauguin_Self-Portrait

Gauguin

Gauguin

Paul Gauguin. Self-Portrait. 1896. Oil on canvas. Musée d'Orsay, Paris, France.

gauguin_Black_Pigs

Gauguin

Gauguin

Paul Gauguin. Black Pigs. 1891. Oil on canvas. Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest, Hungary

gauguin_Effect_of_Snow

Gauguin

Gauguin

Paul Gauguin. Effect of Snow. 1879. Oil on canvas. Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest, Hungary

gauguin_Breton_Girls_Dancing

Gauguin

Gauguin

Paul Gauguin. Breton Girls Dancing. 1888. Pastel on paper. Rijksmuseum Vincent van Goug, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

gauguin_Washerwomen_at_Pont-Aven

Gauguin

Gauguin

Paul Gauguin. Washerwomen at Pont-Aven. 1886. Oil on canvas. Musée d'Orsay, Paris, France

gauguin_Self-Portrait

Gauguin

Gauguin

Paul Gauguin. Self-Portrait. c.1891. Oil on canvas. The National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, USA.

gauguin_Harvesting_of_Grapes_at_Arles_(Misères_humaines)

Gauguin

Gauguin

Paul Gauguin. Harvesting of Grapes at Arles (Misères humaines). 1888. Oil on canvas. Art Museum Ordrupgard, Copenhagen, Denmark.

gauguin_Te_arii_vahine_(The_King's_Wife)

Gauguin

Gauguin

Paul Gauguin. Te arii vahine (The King's Wife). 1896. Oil on canvas. The Pushkin Museum of Fine Art, Moscow, Russia.

gauguin_The_Great_Buddha

Gauguin

Gauguin

Paul Gauguin. The Great Buddha. 1899. Oil on canvas. The Pushkin Museum of Fine Art, Moscow, Russia.

gauguin_Aha_oe_feii?_(Are_You_Jealous?) 1892

Gauguin

Gauguin

Paul Gauguin. Aha oe feii? (Are You Jealous?) 1892. Oil on canvas. The Pushkin Museum of Fine Art, Moscow, Russia.

gauguin_Self-Portrait

Gauguin

Gauguin

Paul Gauguin. Self-Portrait. 1890s. Oil on canvas. The Pushkin Museum of Fine Art, Moscow, Russia.

gauguin_Matamoe_(Landscape_with_Peacocks)

Gauguin

Gauguin

Paul Gauguin. Matamoe (Landscape with Peacocks). 1892. Oil on canvas. The Pushkin Museum of Fine Art, Moscow, Russia

gauguin_Fruits

Gauguin

Gauguin

Paul Gauguin. Fruits. 1888. Oil on canvas. The Pushkin Museum of Fine Art, Moscow, Russia.

gauguin_Ceramic_Vase_with_a_Caricature_Self-Portrait

Gauguin

Gauguin

Paul Gauguin. Ceramic Vase with a Caricature Self-Portrait. 1889. Oil on canvas. Musée d'Orsay, Paris, France.

gauguin_At_the_Pond

Gauguin

Gauguin

Paul Gauguin. At the Pond. 1887. Oil on canvas. Rijksmuseum Vincent van Goug, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

gauguin_Bonjour,_Monsieur_Gauguin

Gauguin

Gauguin

Paul Gauguin. Bonjour, Monsieur Gauguin. 1889. Oil on canvas. Narodni Gallery, Prague, Czech Republic.