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BASQUIAT

Jean-Michael Basquiat (1960-1988) Skip to Images

"The only thing the market liked better than a hot young artist was a dead hot young artist, and it got one in Jean-Michel Basquiat, whose working life of about nine years was truncated by a heroin overdose at the age of twenty-seven. His career, both actual and posthumous, appealed to a cluster of toxic vulgarities. First, the racist idea of the black as naif or rhythmic innocent, and of the black artist as "instinctual," someone outside "mainstream" culture and therefore not to be rated in its terms: a wild pet for the recently cultivated collector. Second, a fetish about the freshness of youth, blooming among the discos of the East Side scene. Third, guilt and political correctness, which made curators and collectors nervous about judging the work of any black artist who could be presented as a "victim." Fourth, art-investment mania. And last, the audience's goggling appetite for self-destructive talent: Pollock, Montgomery Clift. All this gunk rolled into a sticky ball around Basquiat's tiny talent and produced a reputation.
"Basquiat's career was incubated by the short-lived graffiti movement, which started on the streets and subway cars in the early 1970s, peaked, fell out of view, began all over again in the 1980s, peaked again, and finally receded, leaving Basquiat and the amusingly facile Keith Haring as its only memorable exponents. Unlike Haring, however, Basquiat never tagged the subways. The son of middle-class Brooklyn parents, he had a precocious success with his paintings from the start. The key was not that they were "primitive," but that they were so arty. Stylistically, they were pastiches of older artists he admired: Cy Twombly, Jean Dubuffet. Having no art training, he never tried to deal with the real world through drawing; he could only scribble and jot, rehearsing his own stereotypes, his pictorial nouns for "face" or "body" over and over again. Consequently, though Basquiat's images look quite vivid and sharp at first sight, and though from time to time he could bring off an intriguing passage of spiky marks or a brisk clash of blaring color, the work quickly settles into the visual monotony of arid overstyling. Its relentless fortissimo is wearisome. Critics made much of Basquiat's use of sources: vagrant code-symbols, quotes from Leonardo or Gray's Anatomy, African bushman art or Egyptian murals. But these were so scattered, so lacking in plastic force or conceptual interest, that they seem mere browsing - homeless representation.
"The claims made for Basquiat were absurd and already seem like period pieces. 'Since slavery and oppression under white supremacy are visible subtexts in Basquiat's work ,' intoned one essayist in the catalog to his posthumous retrospective at the Whitney Museum, 'he is as close to Goya as American painting has ever produced.' Another extolled his 'punishing regime of self-abuse' as part of 'the disciplines imposed by the principle of inverse asceticism to which he was so resolutely committed.' Inverse asceticism, apparently, is PC-speak for addiction. There was much more in, so to speak, this vein. But the effort to promote Basquiat into an all-purpose inflatable martyr-figure, the Little Black Rimbaud of American painting, remains unconvincing."

- From "American Visions", by Robert Hughes

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Basquiat

Basquait, Jean-Michel Untitled 1984 Acrylic, oil paintstick, and silkscreen on canvas 88 x 77 in (223.5 x 195.6 cm) Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat ©1999 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

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Basquiat

Basquait, Jean-Michel Arroz con pollo 1981 Acrylic and oil paintstick on canvas 68 x 84 in (172.7 x 213.4 cm) Collection of Felipe Grimberg ©1999 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

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Basquiat

Basquait, Jean-Michel Untitled 1981 Acrylic, oil paintstick, and spray paint on wood 72 x 48 in (182.9 x 121.9 cm) The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles ©1999 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

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Basquiat

Basquait, Jean-Michel Untitled 1982 Acrylic and oil paintstick on canvas 76 x 94 in (193 x 238.8 cm) Collection of Rita Krauss and Phyllis Mack ©1999 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

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Basquiat

Basquait, Jean-Michel Earth 1984 Acrylic on canvas 66 x 60 in (167.6 x 152.4 cm) Galerie Bruno Bischofberger, Zurich ©1999 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

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Basquiat

Basquait, Jean-Michel Untitled 1981 Acrylic and crayon on canvas 78 x 68 in (198.1 x 172.7 cm) Bruce R. Lewin Fine Art, New York ©1999 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

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Basquiat

Basquait, Jean-Michel Hollywood Africans 1983 Acrylic and oil paintstick on canvas 84 x 84 in (213.4 x 213.4 cm) Whitney Museum of American Art, New York ©1999 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

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Basquiat

Basquait, Jean-Michel Logo 1984 Acrylic and silkscreen on canvas 60 1/4 x 48 in (153 x 121.9 cm) Private collection ©1999 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

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Basquiat

Basquait, Jean-Michel Self-Portrait 1982 Acrylic, oil paintstick, and spray paint on canvas 76 x 94 in (193 x 238.8 cm) Collection of Bo Franzen ©1999 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

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Basquiat

Basquait, Jean-Michel Sienna 1984 Acrylic, oil paintstick, and silkscreen on canvas 88 x 77 in (223.5 x 195.6 cm) Sperone Westwater Gallery, New York ©1999 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

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Basquiat

Basquait, Jean-Michel Untitled (Skull) 1981 Acrylic and oil paintstick on canvas 81 1/2 x 69 1/4 in (207 x 175.9 cm) Broad Collection, Los Angeles ©1999 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

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Basquiat

Basquait, Jean-Michel Wine of Babylon 1984 Acrylic, oil, and oil paintstick on canvas 86 x 68 in (218.4 x 172.7 cm) Collection of Stefan T. Edlis ©1999 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

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Basquiat

BASQUIAT, Jean-Michel Self-Portrait as a Heel, Part Two 1982 Acrylic and oil paintstick on canvas 243.8 x 156.2 cm (96 x 61 1/2 in.) Collection of Stephane Janssen ©1999 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

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Basquiat

BASQUIAT, Jean-Michel Untitled (Red Man) 1981 Acrylic, oil paintstick, and spray paint on canvas 204.5 x 210.8 cm (80 1/2 x 83 in.) Annina Nosei Gallery, New York ©1999 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

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Basquiat

BASQUIAT, Jean-Michel Untitled 1981 Acrylic, oil paintstick, and spray paint on wood 186.1 x 125.1 cm (73 1/4 x 49 1/4 in.) Collection of Robert Lehrman ©1999 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris